ONTARIO

INTERNATIONAL

SCHOOL

COURSE CALENDAR

2020 2021

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1. The Importance of a Secondary Education
2. Compulsory School Age Requirement
3. The School’s Overall Goals and Philosophy
4. School Organization
4.1 Reporting student achievement to parents
4.2 School’s Terms and Timetable Organization
5. School Expectations for Students
5.1 Attendance Policies
5.2 Policies on Missing or Being Late for Tests, Exams, or Assignments
5.3 Policies on Cheating and Plagiarism
6. School’s Code of Conduct
6.1 Policies on Student Behaviour
7. Requirement for the OSSD
7.1 A list of courses that meet compulsory and optional credit requirements
7.2 A description of the Community Involvement Requirements and Procedures
7.3 Substitutions for Compulsory Credits
7.4 Waiving Prerequisites
7.5 The Provincial Secondary School Literacy Requirement
7.6 Requirements for the Ontario Secondary School Certificate (OSSC)
7.7 The Certificate of Accomplishment
8. Course Information
8.1 The definition of a credit
8.2 Definitions of the types of courses
8.3 An explanation of the course coding system
8.4 Hardware & Software Requirements for Course Content Access for On-line Courses
8.5 Descriptions of Courses Offered by Ontario International School in 2020-2021
      (on-line delivery only)
8.6 Outline of Courses of Study
8.7 Access to Curriculum Policy Documents
8.8 Experiential Learning Programs
8.9 Full Disclosure/Students Withdrawing from a Course
8.10 Changing Course Type
8.11 PLAR Equivalency and PLAR Challenge
8.12 Evaluation and Examination Policies
8.13 Recording and Reporting
9. School Services
9.1 Supports related to guidance and to education and career/life planning including the Individual
      Pathways Plan
9.2 Strategies and resources for students and parents to support education planning and the
      course selection process
9.3 Supports for English Language Learners
9.4 Computer Labs and Resource Centre/Library
9.5 Community Resources
10. Special Education
10.1 An explanation of accommodations provided
1. The Importance of a Secondary Education
At Ontario International School (OIS) there is an emphasis made to all students about the value of completing a full secondary program, which includes providing information regarding all requirements for graduation including the Literacy Requirement and Community Involvement. This information is outlined in this Course Calendar. OIS provides individual courses for students attending a secondary program in both a face-to-face/virtual and on-line environment.
2. Compulsory School Age Requirement
In the province of Ontario, students must remain in school, actively engaged in an education program suited to the student until that student reaches the age of 18 or achieves an Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD).
3. The School’s Overall Goals and Philosophy
Ontario International School aims to create a transformed culture where well-being is supported in every aspect of a student’s school experience. We have a shared understanding of student achievement and responsibility, keeping the needs of parents and students in mind.Ontario International School`s philosophy is based on building genuine relationships with students, parents, and one another. Together, we aim to create an environment which is beneficial towards building a bright future.
  • We care by being compassionate towards all stakeholders of the community at large
  • A coordinated approach to provide a continuous service that is adapted from the needs of students, parents, staff, and environment
  • We value honesty by showing through our words and actions that we are truthful and trustworthy
  • By treating all with respect and high regards
4. School Organizationa
4.1 Reporting student achievement to parents
 
A report card will be provided to the student and parent twice per course, one mid-way through the course and one at the end of the course. A report card will be sent to the student's parent(s) and/or guardian by mail after the completion of every course. The original copy will be mailed to the parent/guardian and the student shall receive a photocopy of their grade report. The report card will be issued within 5 business days of the completion of the course in question. Theparents/guardian may request a copy of the student’s OST. The OST will require up to 3 business days to process.
 
4.2 School’s Terms and Timetable Organization
 
OIS will offer a variety of credit courses in the areas of English, English As a Second Language and Mathematics to students from grades 9-12 during the 2020-2021 school year. Courses will be taught on-line either through the day, in the evening, and/or on weekends. Summer credit courses are also delivered. The school accepts registrations on a continuous basis. Once enrolled, a student will have a maximum of _ _ _ to complete a course. It is expected that a student will be active in the planned synchronous and asynchronous learning on a regular basis with the pace to be determined between the teacher and student.
5. School Expectations for Students
5.1 Attendance Policies
 
Face-to-face/Virtual Course Delivery:
  • If students are less than 15 minutes late to class, they should proceed directly to class. If students are more than 15 minutes late, they should go to the main office to contact parents to verify their late arrival.
  • If a student has to leave during the day, he/she needs to have a written note AND sign out through the main office.
  • If students are consistently late, teachers will contact home. Referrals to the administration may follow.
  • Students are expected to attend classes when a supply teacher is present.
 
Online Course Delivery:
  • Students who enrol in online learning will be expected to log into our learning management system
  • This system will monitor total hours logged by students. Students will also be entrusted with logging a set amount of hours to complete the course
  • Students who fail to log these hours may be contacted by staff through email to inquire about the situation, or to communicate to the parents about what is occurring.
 
Specific Procedures for addressing absenteeism:
Students are expected to be at school at scheduled times, unless they are unable to attend by reason of sickness, unavoidable cause (illness, bereavement, court appearance, etc), holy day or other authorized by the administration of the school. Absences are to be both validated and authorized. All absences require authorization by a parent/guardian.Truancies are invalid absences during instructional time and are strictly unacceptable. These will be monitored and dealt with accordingly by both teachers and administration.
 
The school will contact the homes of students with unexplained absences on a daily basis. If a message is received, parents should contact the school or the teacher before the beginning of the next scheduled session.If any test or assignment is missed because of an invalid absence, the student may forfeit the right to make it up.
 
When a student misses a full day of classes, a phone call from the parent/guardian to the school validating the absence is required. This will be noted on the student’s attendance record. If a parent does not contact the school, the student is required to bring in a parental note with a valid reason for the absence upon returning to school.
 
Consequences of truancy are significant in both the short and long term. Truancy impacts progress and often results in students requiring additional supports. School consequences may be assigned as a result of the following:
  • Failure to attend classes on time;
  • Failure to validate any absence; and
  • Failure to follow the process for validating absences.
If the student continues to be truant, a series of escalated consequences will be assigned which may include:
  • loss of privileges
  • written reflections
  • referral to school principal
  • meeting with parents
  • detention and/or reprimand
  • removal from course and/or school
 
The above is applicable to an on-line setting as well but with differences. Instead of tracking whether a student physically comes to school, online attendance will be monitored by the amount of hours spent while in each course’s Moodle Learning Management System. Along with the number of hours they log while working on activities, students will be engaged in maintaining a learning log to track personal progress. These two factors will illustrate whether a student is truant, and if the above consequences will apply.
 
5.2 Policies on Missing or Being Late for Tests, Exams, or Assignments
 
A student’s grade in a course is determined based on the student demonstrating the degree to which he/she meets the curriculum expectations of the course. Attendance and punctuality are paramount with regards to Tests and Exams and the prompt meeting of assignment deadlines. Lateness or Absence for Tests, and Late or Missing assignments can adversely affect the student’s assessment and evaluation results.
Students with legitimate reasons for a missing test, exam, or an assignment, must submit appropriate documentation to support their claim. Legitimate reasons and documentation may include, but are not limited to, illness and a doctor’s note. The Principal shall determine if a student’s reason and supporting documentation for missing a test, exam, or submitting late or missing assignments are acceptable.
5.3 Policies on Cheating and Plagiarism
 
As per Growing Success, OIS’s policies regarding the prevention of cheating and plagiarism are as follows:
 
Students are expected to practice Academic Honesty by appropriately acknowledging the work of others and supplying original proof of their learning. Cheating occurs when a student attempts to gain an unfair advantage in academic assessment by misrepresenting their own learning or the learning of others. Forms may include, but are not limited to, the following:
  • Using non-approved aids/materials/assistance;
  • Taking from another student or letting another student take material;
  • Offering to do, in whole or in part, another person’s work with the expectation that it will be submitted by a student for evaluation; and
  • Changing a percentage mark of an evaluation.
Likewise, plagiarism refers to the representation of someone else’s work, thoughts, or intellectual property as one’s own. Proper acknowledgment is needed in all facets of using another person’s material. Forms of plagiarism include, but are not limited to, the use of the following without proper citation or reference:
  • Another’s written or spoken idea, opinion, or theory;
  • Misrepresenting a collaboration as one’s own;
  • Artistic or technical work created by another;
  • Paraphrase or summary;
  • Copying from the internet without proper source acknowledgment; and
  • Downloading research papers from the Web and submitting it as one’s own paper.
The Principal shall ensure implementation of the Academic Honesty procedure by facilitating the use of resources made to support school and classroom implementation, using this procedure and responding to concerns expressed by the school and community in a consistent manner, and monitoring/facilitating the support of students who have been referred by the teachers.
 
Teachers shall implement the Academic Honesty procedure by communicating to students and guardians early and throughout the year regarding the following:
  • Responsibly providing evidence of their own achievement and that cheating/plagiarism will not be condoned,
  • Concepts and vocabulary related to academic honesty,
  • Skills/strategies to promote academic honesty,
  • Methods and tools to prevent and/or detect cheating and plagiarism, and
  • Consequences for cheating and plagiarism.
They will also implement the practices as outlined in Growing Success in regards to for, as, and of learning practices.
 
When plagiarism or cheating is detected, it will be investigated. If plagiarism/cheating is confirmed by the teacher, they will inform the principal, the student, and the parent/guardian (when the student is under the age of 18) of the specific details regarding the plagiarized assignment or the allegation of cheating and the resulting consequences.
 
Minimum Consequences for Plagiarism:
  • A consequence for cheating and plagiarism may result in a mark of zero for the assignment / exam in question;
  • A repeated pattern of academic dishonesty may result in an escalating severity of consequences;
  • All students who face the consequences of plagiarism or cheating have the right to appeal the teacher’s decision to the principal.
 
Ontario International School has developed an Acceptable Use Policy which clearly outlines requirements and ethical practices regarding the use of technology. Consequences for inappropriate use of technology are also referenced in this policy. The full policy is posted on the school website at: ontariointernationalschool.com
6. School’s Code of Conduct
6.1 Policies on Student Behaviour
This Code of Student Behaviour supports an environment which fosters the most effective teaching and learning. The Code of Student Behaviour is in effect while students are engaged in any learning activity which may be on-line, on school property, adjacent to school property, or on school-sponsored activities such as trips, sports events and dances.
Some important elements of that positive environment are:
  1. a sense of business-like purpose and commitment to education on the part of students, staff, and parents;
  2. mutual respect and co-operation among students, staff, and parents;
  3. a supportive, friendly atmosphere where each individual is treated in a fair and unbiased manner;
  4. physically neat, clean and safe grounds and building;
  5. pride in Ontario International School as a school with high academic standards;
  6. freedom of individual expression within a framework of respect for the rights and responsibilities of others;
  7. recognition of the value of gender, cultural, racial, physical and social diversity of our community.
Respect For Self
Students shall act within the bounds of all provincial and federal laws. They are expected to come to school free from the influence of alcohol or any illegal substances. They are forbidden to possess or use such substances anywhere on school property, adjacent to school property or during school activities.
 
Respect For Others
Students are to be courteous and considerate in dealings with others. They are not to threaten, coerce or harass others verbally, physically, emotionally or sexually. Inappropriate language and the inappropriate use of other communication tools such as the Internet will not be tolerated.
 
Respect For Property
Students are to treat the school grounds, the school building, and everything in the school with respect. They may not deface or damage school property by writing on or scratching desks, chairs, lockers, or walls. Garbage must be deposited in the bins which are located throughout the school. Any vandalism or damage to property will be dealt with by the school administration and police. Damage to school property will be paid for by the student.
 
Respect For Authority
While on school property and during all school activities, students are to follow all school rules and expectations of school staff, including giving their name, when asked. If a student believes that they have been unfairly treated, discuss the problem with the staff member involved and then, if necessary, with a school administrator. Students may include your parents/guardians in such discussions.
At the beginning of each term/course, teachers will outline their individual classroom and course expectations. The homeroom teacher will review various school policies and will answer questions about school policies and expectations.
 
Policies or Consequences for Negative Behaviour (if applicable)
Consequences for inappropriate behaviour may include:
1. counselling;
2. temporary exclusion from class;
3. temporary confiscation of inappropriate item;
4. direction to change clothing to align with Dress Code
5. parent/guardian contact;
6. working in class under close supervision;
7. reflective writing/reading;
8. detention(s);
9. mediation or restorative meeting(s);
10. referral to outside agencies;
11. loss of privileges such as attendance at dances, parking,participation in school events, and team membership;
12. behaviour and performance contract;
13. clean up duty and/or restitution for damages;
14. change in timetable (permanent exclusionfrom class);
15. police involvement;
16. formal suspension from school;
17. expulsion from the school.
7. Requirement for the OSSD
The Ontario Secondary School program is designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills they will need to lead satisfying and productive lives after school. The program prepares students for further education, work, and also helps them to become independent, productive, and responsible members of society.
The program typically extends over four years for local Ontario students and students are awarded the Ontario Secondary School Diploma upon successful completion of the program i.e. the earning of 30 credits, and meeting the Ministry requirements in the area of community involvement activities and literacy.
All courses offered by OIS have been developed in accordance with the requirements of the Ontario Ministry of Education.
7.1 A list of courses that meet compulsory and optional credit requirements
The OSSD, The Ontario Secondary School Diploma, has the following requirements;
COMPULSORY CREDITS (TOTAL OF 18)
4 credits in English (1 credit per grade)
  • The Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course (OSSLC) may be used to meet either the Grade11 or the Grade 12 English compulsory credit requirement.
  • The Grade 11 Contemporary Aboriginal Voices course may be used to meet the Grade 11 English compulsory credit requirement.
  • For English as a second language (ESL) or English literacy development (ELD); the fourth credit must be a Grade 12 compulsory English course.
3 credits in Mathematics (at least 1 credit in Grade 11 or 12)
2 credits in Science
1 credit in the Arts
  • The Grade 9 Expressing Aboriginal Cultures course may be used to meet the compulsory credit requirement in the arts.
1 credit in Canadian Geography (Grade 9)
1 credit in Canadian History (Grade 10)
1 credit in French as a Second Language
  • Students who have taken Native languages in place of French as a Second language in elementary school may use a level 1 or 2 Native language course to meet the compulsory credit requirement for French as a second language.
1 credit in Health and Physical Education
0.5 credit in Career Studies
0.5 credit in Civics
3 additional credit, consisting of 1 credit from each of the following groups:
Group 1: English (including the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course), French as a   second language, classical languages, international languages, Native languages, Canadian and world studies, Native studies, social science and humanities, guidance and career education, cooperative education
Group 2: French a second language, the arts, business studies, health and physical education, cooperative education
Group 3: French as a second language, science(Grade11 or 12), computer studies, technologicaleducation, cooperative education
Note: the following conditions apply to selections from the above three groups;
  • A maximum of 2 credits in French as a second language may count as additional compulsory credits, 1 credit from Group1, and 1 credit from either Group2 or Group3.
  • A maximum of 2 credits in cooperative education may count as additional compulsory credits, selected from any of Groups 1, 2 or 3.
7.2 A description of the Community Involvement Requirements and Procedures
All students must complete a minimum of 40 hours of unpaid community involvement activities before graduating from high school. This requirement is in addition to the 30 credits required for a high school diploma.
The community involvement requirement is designed to encourage students to develop awareness and understanding of civic responsibility and of the role they can play in supporting and strengthening their communities.
 
Students must complete their community involvement by the end of first semester of the year they intend on graduating, and hand it in to office staff accordingly. Once all information is verified as correct and adds up to 40 hours, administration will update the entry of completion on the OST. All students must record their service in the appropriate document sheet found in the school’s office, outlining the following:
  • Date they participated,
  • A description of the activity,
  • Name of their supervisor as well as their signature, and
  • Contact information of the supervisor or organization for validating purposes
All eligible community involvement may include:
  • Charity work and/or their fundraising events;
  • Volunteering at a community based service such as a school, hospital, and nursing home; and
  • Participating in community organized groups such as a recycling program and assisting with local children’s sports teams
 
Procedure: OIS will begin to offer the Community Involvement requirement for graduation once a student begins working toward an OSSD
7.3 Substitutions for Compulsory Credits
In order to provide the flexibility an individual student’s program, principals may substitute up to three compulsory credits with courses from other subject areas specified in the list of compulsory credit requirements (including Groups 1, 2 and 3).
 
When a principal grants a substitution for a compulsory credit a form noting the details is completed and filed in the OSR and appropriately noted on the OST.
 
Procedure: Currently, OIS will not be granting substitutions for compulsory credits.
 
7.4 Waiving Prerequisites
 
OIS provides students and parents with information about prerequisites for courses as indicated in the Course Description section of this Course calendar.
The principal will determine whether or not a prerequisite should be waived. The principal will make the following considerations in the decision to waive a prerequisite:
 
  • The principal must be satisfied that waving the prerequisite will not hinder the chances of success in the course for which the prerequisite is a requirement.
  • The student understands that the prerequisite course in question prepares the student for the course which requires the prerequisite course.
  • The student/parent must request the waiver in writing using the appropriate form provided by the school. The form is then filed in the student’s file (OSR).
 
Procedure: OIS will not be waiving prerequisites in 2020--2021
7.5 The Provincial Secondary School Literacy Requirement
The Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT) is the standard method for assessing the literacy skills of students in Ontario for the purpose of determining whether students meet the provincial secondary school literacy requirement for graduation. The OSSLT is generally written by all Grade 10 students and must be successfully completed in order to obtain an Ontario Secondary School Diploma. Exemptions can be made for students who are intentionally not working towards an OSSD. Deferral can be granted to students who did not successfully complete Grade 9 English or students who are registered in English as a Second Language. Students who are granted a deferral will write the test at the next scheduled sitting. The OSSLT can be written more than once. Students who have been eligible to write the test twice and who have failed it at one of those opportunities may take The Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course (OLC4O) in place of the OSSLT, to fulfill the Literacy Requirement.
 
Procedure:The school will not be offering OLC40 in 2020--2021.
The school will ensure, for international students, that ESLDO or equivalency will be the minimum requirement for writing the OSSLT.
7.6 Requirements for the Ontario Secondary School Certificate (OSSC)
The Ontario Secondary School Certificated (OSSC) will be granted, on request, to students who are leaving secondary school upon reaching the age of eighteen without having met the requirements for the Ontario Secondary School Diploma. To be granted an OSSC, a student must have earned a minimum of 14 credits, distributed as follows.
 
7 required compulsory credits
  • 2 credits in English
  • 1 credit in mathematics
  • 1 credit in science
  • 1 credit Canadian history or Canadian geography
  • 1 credit health and physical education
  • 1 credit in the arts, computer studies, or technological education
 
7 required optional credits
  • 7 credits selected by the student from available courses
 
The provisions for making substitutions for compulsory credits described in section 6.2 also apply to the Ontario secondary School Certificate.
7.7 The Certificate of Accomplishment
Students who are leaving secondary school upon reaching the age of eighteen without having met the requirements for the Ontario Secondary School Diploma or the Ontario Secondary School Certificated may be granted a Certificate of Accomplishment. The Certificate of Accomplishment may be a useful means of recognizing achievement for students who plan to take certain kinds offurther training, or who plan to find employment directly after leaving school. The Certificate of Accomplishment is to be accompanied by the student’s Ontario Student Transcript. For students who have an Individual Education Plan (IEP), a copy of the IEP may be included.Students who return to school to complete additional credit and non-credit courses (including courses with modified or alternative expectations in special education programs) will have their transcript updated accordingly but will not be issued a new Certificate of Accomplishment. The Ontario Secondary School Diploma or Ontario Secondary School Certificate will be granted when the returning student has fulfilled the appropriate requirements.
8. Course Information
8.1 The definition of a credit
The following passage provides the definition of an academic credit and the procedure for awarding credits as stipulated by the Ontario Ministry of Education.
 
A credit is granted in recognition of the successful completion of a course (denoted by a mark of 50% or greater) that has been scheduled for a minimum of 110 hours. Courses that are offered on-line will be using a continuous intake method utilizing both synchronous and asynchronous teaching and learning, where hours will be tracked for both on-line and off-line activities. Credits are granted by a principal on behalf of the Minister of Education for courses that have been developed or approved by the ministry. A half credit may be granted for each 55-hour part of a 110-hour ministry developed course. Half-credit courses must comply with ministry requirements as outlined in the curriculum policy documents.
 
For the purposes of granting a credit, scheduled time is defined as the time during which students participate in planned learning activities designed to lead to the achievement of the curriculum expectations of a course. Planned learning activities include interaction between the teacher and the student and assigned individual or group work (other than homework) related to the achievement of the learning expectations in the course. Planned learning activities will be delivered through classroom or e-learning instruction and activities and/or community placements related to work experience and cooperative education.
 
8.2 Definitions of the types of courses
In grades 9 and 10, three types of courses are offered: academic, applied and open.
  • Open courses are suitable for all students and prepare them for further study that will enrich their education generally. Open courses are credit--based and are counted towards diploma requirements.
  • Academic courses emphasize theory and abstract problems. They are designed to prepare students for Grade 11 and 12 university and university/college preparation courses.
  • Applied courses focus on practical applications and concrete examples. They are designed to prepare students for Grade 11 and 12 college and workplace preparation courses.
 
In Grades 11 and 12, four types of courses are offered:
  • Workplace preparation courses prepare you to move directly into the workplace after high school or to be admitted into apprenticeship programs or other training programs in the community. Courses focus on employment skills and on practical workplace applications of the subject content. Many workplace preparation courses involve cooperative education and work experience placements, which allow students to get first--hand experience in a workplace.
  • University/College preparation courses are offered to prepare you to meet the entrance requirements of certain university and college programs. They focus on both theory and practical applications.
College preparation courses are offered to prepare you to meet the entrance requirements for most college programs. Courses focus on practical applications and also examine
  • University entrance requirements. Courses emphasize theoretical aspects of the subject and also consider related applications.
8.3 An explanation of the course coding system
  • The course code consists of a course title and a six character code: the Ministry of Education designates the first five characters. The sixth character is determined by the school.
Code Characters
Explanation
Example - ENG 1 D I
1st, 2nd, and 3rd
Subject discipline of the course in letters
“ENG” English
4th
Grade level as a number * (see below)
“1” grade 9 “3” grade 11
“2” grade 10 “4” grade 12
“1” grade 9 or first year
5th
Type of course as a letter
“D” Academic
“P” Applied
“L” Locally Developed
“O” Open
“E” Workplace
“U” University
“C” College
“M” University/College
“D” Academic course
6th
Board designated character that indicates credit value or may be used to differentiate between courses with similar codes
1 credit
2 credit
C coop
8.4 Hardware & Software Requirements for Course Content Access for On line Courses
If a student has enrolled in an on line credit course, the following is a list of hardware and software options that will be needed to access course content.
We recommend that students update software and Internet browsers regularly on each device. For the best experience, try the following connectivity recommendations for accessing Moodle:
  • Desktop and Laptop Computers—for the most user-friendly experience
  • Operating System
    • Windows 7 or later
    • Mac OS 10.7 or later
  • Browsers—the latest versions of the following:
    • Google Chrome
    • Mozilla Firefox
    • Internet Explorer 11 or newer
    • Microsoft Edge (Windows 10 only)
    • Safari (Mac only)
  • Browser Plugins—the latest versions of the following:
    • Adobe Flash Player
    • Adobe Reader DC
    • Adobe Air
    • Adobe Connect
    • Java
    • VLC Media Player (Mac only)
  • Software
    • Microsoft Office 2007 or newer
    • G Suite- Google’s version of Microsoft Office where students can make emails, documents, power points, etc
    • Zoom Video Communications-For video calls with teachers and other classmates
    • If a student is an international student, they may need a VPN service to access the above software
Additionally, students should note that a broadband connection is required and a minimum download speed of 8Mps should be requested from your ISP. Please note that if there are multiple devices connected to your bandwidth, you should request a minimum download speed of 25Mps. Any speed less than these recommended amounts may result in a poor user experience.
8.5 Descriptions of Courses Offered by Ontario International School in 2020 2021
(on line delivery only)

 

English as a Second Language

 

Grade: Open
Course Name: English as a Second Language, ESL Level 1
Course Type: Open
Course Code: ESLAO
Credit Value: 1.0
Prerequisite: Open


This course builds on students’ previous education and language knowledge to introduce them to the English language and help them adjust to the diversity in their new environment. Students will use beginning English language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing for everyday and essential academic purposes. They will engage in short conversations using basic English language structures and simple sentence patterns; read short adapted texts; and write phrases and short sentences. The course also provides students with the knowledge and skills they need to begin to adapt to their new lives in Canada.


Grade: Open
Course Name: English as a Second Language, ESL Level 2
Course Type: Open
Course Code: ESLBO
Credit Value: 1.0
Prerequisite: ESLAO, English as a Second Language, Level 1, Open or equivalent


This course extends students’ listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in English for everyday and academic purposes. Students will participate in conversations in structured situations on a variety of familiar and new topics; read a variety of texts designed or adapted for English language learners; expand their knowledge of English grammatical structures and sentence patterns; and link English sentences to compose paragraphs. The course also supports students’ continuing adaptation to the Ontario school system by expanding their knowledge of diversity in their new province and country.


Grade: Open
Course Name: English as a Second Language, ESL Level 3
Course Type: Open
Course Code: ESLCO
Credit Value: 1.0
Prerequisite: ESLBO, English as a Second Language, Level 2, Open or equivalent


This course builds on students’ previous education and language knowledge to introduce them to the English language and help them adjust to the diversity in their new environment. Students will use beginning English language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing for everyday and essential academic purposes. They will engage in short conversations using basic English language structures and simple sentence patterns; read short adapted texts; and write phrases and short
sentences. The course also provides students with the knowledge and skills they need to begin to adapt to their new lives in Canada.

Grade: Open
Course Name: English as a Second Language, ESL Level 4
Course Type: Open
Course Code: ESLDO
Credit Value: 1.0
Prerequisite: ESLCO, English as a Second Language, Level 3, Open or equivalent


This course prepares students to use English with increasing fluency and accuracy in classroom and social situations and to participate in Canadian society as informed citizens. Students will develop the oral presentation, reading, and writing skills required for success in all school subjects. They will extend listening and speaking skills through participation in discussions and seminars; study and interpret a variety of grade level texts; write narratives, articles, and summaries in English; and respond critically to a variety of print and media texts.


Grade: Open
Course Name: English as a Second Language, ESL Level 5
Course Type: Open
Course Code: ESLEO
Credit Value: 1.0
Prerequisite: ESLDO, English as a Second Language, Level 4, Open or equivalent


This course provides students with the skills and strategies they need to make the transition to college and university preparation courses in English and other secondary school disciplines. Students will be encouraged to develop independence in a range of academic tasks. They will participate in debates and lead classroom workshops; read and interpret literary works and academic texts; write essays, narratives, and reports; and apply a range of learning strategies and research skills effectively. Students will further develop their ability to respond critically to print and media texts.

 

English

 

Grade: 11
Course Name: English
Course Type: University Preparation
Course Code: ENG3U
Credit Value: 1.0
Prerequisite: Grade 10 English, Academic


This course emphasizes the development of literacy, communication, and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will analyze challenging literary texts from various periods, countries, and cultures, as well as a range of informational and graphic texts, and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on using language with precision and clarity and incorporating stylistic devices appropriately and effectively. The course is intended to prepare students for the compulsory Grade 12 university or college preparation course.


Grade: 12
Course Name: English
Course Type: University Preparation
Course Code: ENG4U
Credit Value: 1.0
Prerequisite: Grade 11 English, University Preparation


This course emphasizes the consolidation of the literacy, communication, and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will analyse a range of challenging literary texts from various periods, countries, and cultures; interpret and evaluate informational and graphic texts; and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on using academic language coherently and confidently, selecting the reading strategies best suited to particular texts and particular purposes for reading, and developing greater control in writing. The course is intended to prepare students for university, college, or the workplace.

 

Mathematics

 

Grade 11
Course Name: Functions and Applications
Course Type: University Preparation
Course Code: MCR3U
Credit Value: 1
Prerequisite: Principles of Mathematics, Grade 10, Academic


This course introduces basic features of the function by extending students’ experiences with quadratic relations. It focuses on quadratic, trigonometric, and exponential functions and their use in modeling real world situations. Students will represent functions numerically, graphically, and algebraically; simplify expressions; solve equations; and solve problems relating to applications. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi step problems. Throughout the course, students will engage in the following processes: Problem Solving, Reasoning and Proving, Reflecting, Selecting Tools and Computational Strategies, Connecting, Representing, Communicating.


Grade 12
Course Name: Advanced Functions
Course Type: University Preparation
Course Code: MCR4U
Credit Value: 1
Prerequisite: Functions and Applications, Grade 11, University Preparation


This course extends students’ experience with functions. Students will investigate the properties of polynomial, rational, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions; develop techniques for combining functions; broaden their understanding of rates of change; and develop facility in applying these concepts and skills. Throughout the course, students will engage in the following processes: Problem Solving, Reasoning and Proving, Reflecting, Selecting Tools and Computational Strategies, Connecting, Representing and Communicating. This course is intended both for students taking the Calculus and Vectors course as a prerequisite for a university program and for those wishing to
consolidate their understanding of mathematics before proceeding to any one of a variety of university programs.


Grade: 12
Course Name: Calculus and Vectors
Course Type: University Preparation
Course Code: MCV4U
Credit Value: 1.0
Prerequisite: (Co--requisite) Advanced Functions, Grade 12, University Preparation


This course builds on students' previous experience with functions and their developing understanding of rates of change. Students will solve problems involving geometric and algebraic representations of vectors and representations of lines and planes in three dimensional space; broaden their understanding of rates of change to include the derivatives of polynomial, sinusoidal, exponential, rational, and radical functions; and apply these concepts and skills to the modeling of real--world relationships. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. This course is intended for students who choose to pursue careers in fields such as science, engineering, economics, and some areas of business, including those students who will be required to take a university--level calculus, linear algebra, or physics course.

 

8.6 Outline of Courses of Study


The principal of a Secondary School will retain on file up-to-date copies of the outlines of all of the courses of study for courses offered at the school. These course outlines are available at the school for parents and students to examine.
When the school returns to delivering courses face-to-face, please call the office for more detailed information.


On-line courses:
Outlines of Courses of Study for each on-line course will be posted on the school’s website, as students consider enrolling for an on-line course(s).


8.7 Access to Curriculum Policy Documents


Curriculum Policy Documents for all course offered at . . . . . may be accessed through the Ministry of Education website at
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/curriculum/secondary


8.8 Experiential Learning Programs


Experiential learning programs may be part of the delivery of the curriculum in all disciplines. Experiential learning programs include job shadowing and job twinning, work experience and cooperative education.


Cooperative education programs allow students to earn secondary school credits while completing a work placement in the community.


Work experience is a component of a course that provides students with a learning opportunity in the workplace for a limited period of time.


Job shadowing allows a student to spend one-half to one day observing a worker in a specific occupation. Job twinning provides the opportunity for the student to observe a cooperative education student at his or her placement for one-half to one day.


School Procedure:
Currently OIS does not offer programs in Experiential Learning unless it is an experience to supplement/within an individual course.


8.9 Full Disclosure/Students Withdrawing from a Course


All courses coded with a year 3 or year 4 U, M, C, E or O designation are subject to a Full Disclosure Ministry Policy. If a student withdraws from a course more than five days after the issuing of the mid-term report of each semester he/she will have the course and the mark at the time of withdrawal recorded on a student's transcript (OST). In addition, any repeated courses will be recorded on a student's transcript. This information is made available to Community Colleges and Universities for them to consider when making admission or scholarship decisions.


8.10 Changing Course Type


If a student wishes to change direction or pathway in their program they may do so providing that the prerequisite for the newly chosen course is first taken by the student. The principal may also waive a prerequisite as described earlier in the Course Calendar.


8.11 PLAR Equivalency and PLAR Challenge
Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition (PLAR) is the formal evaluation and credit-granting process whereby students may obtain credits for prior learning. Prior learning includes the knowledge and skills that students have acquired, in both formal and informal ways, outside secondary school. Students may have their knowledge and skills evaluated against the expectations outlined in provincial curriculum policy documents in order to earn credits towards the secondary school diploma. The PLAR process involves two components: "challenge" and "equivalency".
The challenge process involves assessing a student’s prior learning for the purpose of granting a credit for a grade 10, 11, or 12 course developed for a curriculum policy document published in 1999 or later. Formal tests (70%) and a variety of other assessment strategies (30%) will determine if the credit is granted.
The equivalency process is the process of assessing credentials from other jurisdictions. When a student comes to Ontario from outside the province after grade 9, upon receipt of the student’s previous school records, the Principal will assess the student’s records and use guidelines to determine if the credit is granted. Notation and determination of equivalent credits through the PLAR Equivalency provision is included in the student’s OSR and noted on the OST.
All PLAR requires evidence. The learner has the primary responsibility for preparing the evidence that learning has taken place and that it contributes to an appropriate balance of theory and practical application.


Procedure: Once a student indicates intent to work toward an OSSD, OIS will engage in the PLAR equivalency process, but not PLAR challenge.


8.12 Evaluation and Examination Policies


Assessment is the process of gathering evidence from a variety of sources (assignments, demonstrations, projects, performances and tests) that accurately reflects how well a student is achieving the curriculum expectations in a course.


As part of assessment, teachers provide students with descriptive feedback that guides their efforts towards improvement. Evaluation refers to the process of judging the quality of student work on the basis of established criteria, and assigning a value to represent that quality. In Ontario secondary schools, the value assigned will be in the form of a percentage grade.


A final grade is recorded for every course and a credit is granted and recorded for every course in which the student’s grade is 50% or higher. The final grade for each course in Grades 9-12 will be determined as follows:

 

  1. 70% of the grade will be based on evaluations conducted throughout the course. This portion of the grade should reflect the student’s most consistent level of achievement throughout the course, although special consideration should be given to more recent evidence of achievement.

  2. 30% of the grade will be based on a final evaluation in the form of an examination, performance, essay, and/or other method of evaluation suitable to the course content and administered towards the end of the course.

In all of their courses, students must be provided with numerous and varied opportunities to demonstrate the full extent of their achievement of the curriculum expectations categories of knowledge and skills.


The Ontario Curriculum Grades 1-12, in all subjects, asks teachers to assess the achievement levels of overall and specific expectations in the following basic categories:

  • Knowledge/understanding of concepts

  • Thinking and Inquiry

  • Communication of knowledge/concepts/procedures

  • Application/connections of skills

The four basic categories will be balanced or equally applied in all subjects. The categories of the achievement chart influence the, Course Outline, Unit Plans, and Daily Lesson planning of all of the courses offered at . . .. .


Assessment ‘for’ Learning should be carried out at the beginning of a semester, term or unit of study. It may also be conducted when there is evidence of individual class difficulties. Although it may be used for anecdotal reporting, it will never be used to calculate a student’s final mark.


Assessment ‘as’ Learning should be conducted continuously throughout courses in an effort to improve instruction and learning. The aim is to make both students and teachers aware of the expectations to be achieved and the progress being made towards that end. It includes traditional methods of teacher-conducted assessment, student self-assessment and student-peer assessment. Results of Assessment ‘as’ Learning will never be used to calculate a student’s final mark


Assessment ‘of’ Learning occurs at or near the conclusion of an activity, unit of work, term, or course. The results of this evaluation of a student’s achievement are communicated as a grade/mark and are used for the purpose of reporting and to ascertain the degree of realization of course expectations.


8.13 Recording and Reporting


The OSR and OST
The following guidelines were developed in accordance with Ministry of Education, Ontario mandates. The guidelines in this document are a summary of the procedures and requirement of the OSR Guidance, 2000 and the OST Manual, 2010. For complete information you may refer to the Ministry of Education, Ontario website – www.edu.gov.on.ca


When a student enrolls as a full-time student, a file will be established in order to record educational progress. A student file consists of the following components:

  • An Ontario School Record folder

  • Report Cards

  • An Ontario Student Transcript

  • A documentation file, if applicable

  • An office index card

  • Other information identified as conducive to the student’s educational progress

A student's record of courses successfully completed and credits earned toward the Ontario Diploma (OST) is maintained in the Ontario Student Record (OSR). Courses are designated using Ministry of Education course codes.


An up-to-date OST is kept in the student's OSR. Students (or their parents or guardians if they are under the age of eighteen) may check the OSR by appointment with the Principal.


The Ontario Student Record Folder (OSR)

An Ontario Student Record Folder is established/maintained for each student enrolled as a full-time student at . . . .. . The Ontario Student Record folder (OSR) includes Ontario Student Transcript (OST), exact copies of Report Cards and Documentation File, if applicable. The OSR contains information on bibliographical data, schools previously attended, parent’s information, special health information, photographs, information on school activities and other information, if applicable.


Report Cards

Report Card information is completed for each subject at two reporting times per semester (mid and end of semester). A Report Card is completed for each student who has been enrolled in the school for more than six weeks within the reporting period. The Report Card will contain information regarding student academic achievements and suggestions on how to improve performance. Information on the reporting of Learning Skills is also included on the Report Card. If a student has reached the age of 18, they can receive their Report Card in person or by mail. Otherwise, Report Cards will be forwarded to the parents/guardians by pick-up or mail. An exact copy of a completed Report Card will be filed in a student’s file (OSR).


Ontario Student Transcripts (OST)

The Ontario Student Transcript (OST) is a cumulative and continuous record of a student’s successful and unsuccessful attempts at completing OSSD requirements. Transcript information is
stored electronically and available on request. A copy of the transcript will be issued at request, subject to reasonable notice. Students should submit their request in person or by writing to the Administrative Office. Transcripts issued directly to students will bear the notation "Issued to Student.”


An official copy of the transcript is filed in the OSR upon retirement of the student.


Documentation File

When a documentation file is required, as per the OSR Guideline, it will be kept in the student’s OSR folder.


Ontario School Office Index Card

The Office Index Card is maintained to provide the school with immediate access to essential student information. The Card remains at the school during the whole enrolment period and is retained for 55 years after the student leaves the school. Even though it is part of the OSR it is not stored in the OSR and never transferred with the OSR.


Access to Student Information

Student information refers to information related to a student’s academic record at CBA , as well as biographical and personal information. By applying for admission to CBA you accept the school’s right to collect pertinent personal information. The collected information is used for the purposes of admission, registration and to assist the school in the academic and financial administration of its affairs.


We are committed to taking every reasonable step to protect the confidentiality and privacy of personal information.


Employee Access

Only administrative staff of the school, for a legitimate purpose, and faculty are allowed access to a student file.


Student Access

Other individuals have the right to access any collected personal information with the signed permission of the parent or adult student. Other information contained in the student’s file is considered private and confidential and will be disclosed only with written consent or on the presentation of a court order, or otherwise under compulsion of law.

 
9. School Services
9.1 Supports related to guidance and to education and career/life planning including the Individual Pathways Plan
OIS will provide individual counselling for students, who are registered as full-time students, who wish to pursue post-secondary education. The school will ensure that marks are uploaded into OUAC and OCAS as appropriate, provide materials in hard copy from various post-secondary institutions regarding pathways, and provide students with course
choices that lead to various post-secondary programs. The school may also support students with setting up tours/visits to various post-secondary institutions in the area.
9.2 Strategies and resources for students and parents to support education planning and the course selection process
OIS will provide support to full-time students as they are proceeding to make decisions for post-secondary. The Course Calendar will provide a list of course options available at CBA – additional course offerings may be added as needed to support individual/groups of students complete requirements for post-secondary study.

Intervention strategies, supports, and programs for student success, including for students at risk of not graduating:
  • OIS intends to provide only courses that are designated as U or M destination with a limited selection of O courses to round out a timetable.
OIS intends to provide only courses that are designated as U or M destination with a limited selection of O courses to round out a timetable.
9.3 Supports for English Language Learners

OIS will provide ESL courses for students who are newcomers to Canada in order to have students prepared to engage in courses that delivered in the English language.
9.4 Computer Labs and Resource Centre/Library
OIS will encourage all students to access community resources including local libraries where both hard copy and technological resources may be accessed. CBA may also consider engaging in some partnerships with community resources to support/supplement programs that are offered at the school (e.g. the Arts, Computer Studies, etc.).

Students will be encouraged to bring their own technology to school classes to support their inquiry and learning

The technology required for students to adequately engage in on-line courses is outlined in Section 8.4 of this document
9.5 Community Resources

OIS will encourage all students to access community resources including local libraries where both hard copy and technological resources may be accessed. OIS may also consider engaging in some partnerships with community resources to support/supplement programs that may offered at the school e.g. the Arts, Computer Studies, etc.
10. Special Education
10.1 An explanation of accommodations provided
OIS intends to provide only courses that are designated as U or M destination with a limited selection of O courses to round out a timetable.
Students, upon request and because of individual learning styles may be granted additional time, a quiet space etc. in order to complete tests, exams, individual assignments. As per Growing Success students will also be encouraged/permitted to demonstrate meeting curriculum expectations through a variety of strategies, and by presenting evidence through product, conversation or observation.